Category Archives: ΤΑΞΙΔΙ

Supersonic air travel attempts comeback after Concorde era (video)

Imagine being able to travel from Washington DC to London in three-and-a-half hours. Nowadays, you’d be lucky to get there in seven. But from 1976 to 2003, Air France and British Airways’ Concorde made such trips possible until rising maintenance costs and poor ticket sales forced the supersonic jet out of operation. Since then, only a few companies have dared to step into the void left by the airliner by developing their own superfast jets, and by finding ways to overcome flaws that led to Concorde’s demise. Among the brave is aerospace start-up Boom Supersonic, which was established in Colorado less than four years ago, and Aerion in Nevada, which kick-started the race to revive supersonic air travel 16 years ago. Both American enterprises are building airliners that could transport passengers above 50,000 feet (15,200m) in the air – about 15,000 feet (4,500m) higher than commercial air traffic – in order to reach speeds of at speeds of 1,000mph (1,609kmh) and more. Boom founder and CEO Blake Scholl, and Aerion’s Senior Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer Ernie Edwards spoke to Euronews about their attempt to break the sound barrier at the Farnborough International Airshow... Read more at euronews.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Eduard Marmet License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Canadian National Rowing Team to train in Ioannina, Epirus in Greece

The Canadian National Rowing team will be returning to Lake Pamvotida in Ioannina on August 24, to commence training for the Tokyo Olympic Games. More than 50 athletes of the national team elected Ioannina as their destination since, due to the excellent conditions that they encountered there last year, the location is one of their favourite training spots. Head of the Greek Rowing Federation, Ioannis Karras, said that sports tourism in Ioannina is becoming a reality.  He went on to say that they will try and bring more foreign teams to the city so that by becoming a sports venue, it would help to promote Ioannina abroad. Read more at greekreporter.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Pvasiliadis License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Agreement to sell 66% of Greek natgas system operator for €535 million

A contract to sell-off 66% of Greece's state-run Gas Transmission System Operator S.A. (DESFA) was signed on Friday between the country's privatization fund (HRADF) and Hellenic Petroleum (Hel.Pe) group, on the one hand, and the consortium that had submitted the highest offer for the majority stake, Senfluga Energy Infrastructure Holdings S.A. The agreement is worth 535 million euros, and is the result of a memorandum-mandate privatization process that the Greek government agreed to implement, with energy sector liberalization and sell-offs comprising one of the most significant portions of the bailout agreement. The consortium is comprised of Snam S.p.A., Enagás Internacional S.L.U. and Fluxys S.A.   The 66% stake that will be sold off is comprised of 31 percent owned by the Hellenic Republic Asset Development Fund (HRADF) and Hel.Pe group, with 35%. The transaction and handover of the utility is expected to be concluded by the end of the year. Greek and EU regulatory authorities have already greenlighted the sale, with the contract also clearing an obligatory Court of Audit review.  Read more at naftemporiki.gr RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)

Six reasons Greek Olive Oil is the ultimate superfood

Greek olive oil is packed with essential vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin K and vitamin E.  It also contains calcium, iron, sodium, and potassium. Worldwide studies have linked the consumption of olive oil with health benefits, such as a heightened immune system, anti-inflammatory properties and protection against Alzheimer’s. Specifically, Greek extra virgin olive oil, in comparison with other olive oils on the market, has the lowest acidity (approximately 0.5%), way below the minimum 0.9% setup from the EU and US authorities. Consuming Greek olive oil is one of the best products you can add to your diet, in order to obtain major health benefits. Olive oil happens to contain plenty of beneficial polyphenols—the natural compounds in plant foods with antioxidant properties and is significantly high in healthy oleic acid—a monounsaturated, omega-9 fatty acid. Let's take a closer look at why you should start pouring more of this liquid gold straight into your food: Reduces the risk of cancer Oleocanthal, the phytonutrient in olive oil, mimics the effect of ibuprofen in reducing inflammation, which can decrease the risk of breast cancer and its recurrence. Lowers Cholesterol  Olive oil lowers the levels of total blood cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides. At the same time, it does not alter the levels of HDL-cholesterol (and may even raise them), which plays a protective role and prevents the formation of fatty patches, thus stimulating the elimination of the low-density lipoproteins. Lowers blood pressure  Regular consumption of olive oil can help decrease both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Lowers risk of arthritis  Although the reasons are still not fully clear, recent studies have proved that people with diets containing high levels of olive oil are less likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Improves bone calcification A high consumption of olive oil has been shown to improve bone calcification. It helps calcium absorption and so plays an important role in aiding sufferers and in preventing the onset of osteoporosis. Helps prevent Alzheimer’s Olive oil reduces brain inflammation and activates the autophagy process, whereby intracellular debris and toxins are removed. Such debris and toxins are firm markers of Alzheimer’s disease. A reduction in autophagy, researchers claim, is suspected to be the beginning of Alzheimer’s disease. Tip- it’s best to add olive oil onto salads or vegetables, nevertheless it’s also great when baking, roasting or frying. Read more at greekcitytimes.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: pixabay.com Let's block ads! (Why?)

Dance Days Festival in Cretan city of Chania to July 28

The eighth edition of the Dance Days Hania International Contemporary Dance Festival in Crete explores prevailing dance trends in Greece, Europe and around the world through performances and seminars. It offers a commentary on the agility of youth and meaningfulness of experience, while addressing the rapid pace of life and impact of time on thought and motion. The significance of technology and social media networks in everyday life will also be discussed. Performances at various points around the city, dance film projections, and a conference titled “Borders, Limits and Context in Modern Dance,” as well as a photography exhibition, have been organised to run alongside the festival’s main program. For more information, visit www.dancedays.gr. Read more at ekathimerini.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Bernard Gagnon License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Greek tips: How to use extra virgin olive oil

How should I use olive oil? Greeks don’t need to ask, since they consume more of this liquid gold per capita than anyone else in the world. To help those outside the major olive growing regions, Greek Liquid Gold asked Greek olive oil producers and company representatives, plus two prominent European chefs, about their favorite ways to eat olive oil. Some of the responses were unsurprising, while others were more unusual. Like most Greeks, Charalampos Papadellis “loves to eat olive oil with bread,” which “brings out the flavor and the fruitiness” of the oil (Papadellis Olive Oil). Many recommend using extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) raw “so that it does not lose its taste, its strong aromas, and its nutrients,” as Katerina Bougatsou points out. For example, Bougatsou notes, olive oil can be used “as a dressing for fresh salads, like the famous traditional Greek ‘horiatiki’ salad, or even with boiled vegetables,” including wild greens (Stalia Greek EVOO). There are endless variations on the themes of olive oil and bread, and olive oil and salad. Manos Asmarianakis loves “to enjoy a special EVOO” on dakos, a salad made with traditional Cretan twice-baked bread (rusks) with fresh chopped tomato, oregano, and feta or mizithra cheese (Physis of Crete). Gabriel Malet, the chef at the Spanish Embassy in Athens, suggests that “if we have tomato and olive oil, we don’t need to cook; we have a perfect meal, so rich and full of little details and finesse. As Greeks say, what I prefer about Greek salad is the ‘papara’ (soaked bread)—take bread and dip it in the oil with the rest of the liquids from feta and tomato, and see how it combines with oregano.”  Dominique Perrot, former chef for Francois Mitterrand, is one of many who prefers to use the best EVOOs raw, especially in salads. In fact, he says “when we make salad with excellent olive oil, we don’t add vinegar or lemon.” Excellent olive oils can add their own distinctive flavor to salads and other dishes, including boiled eggs and grilled vegetables. Valia Kelidou agrees: she believes extra virgin olive oil “is best consumed raw as a finishing touch to all your dishes” (Kyklopas). Diamantis Pierrakos similarly recommends that it be “drizzled on everything” (Laconiko). As Evi Psounou Prodromou adds, “we eat our EVOO with every food” (Yanni’s Olive Grove). Nikolas Philippidis explains, “you can drizzle it over warm and cold dishes just before serving, or use it in salad dressings, marinades, vinaigrettes, and sauces” (Hellenic Fields).  George Goutis prefers his olive oil on organic vegetables, “Greek salad with goat cheese, spinach pie, and fresh fish. For desert, Greek olive oil cookies, which are so crunchy, lightly sweet, and perfect with a cup of coffee or tea. The recipe comes from my grandmother” (Goutis Estate). Perhaps this one (based on a different grandmother’s recipe) is similar. Some Greeks, including Cristina Stribacu, use olive oil all day. “At breakfast, I eat fresh bread, EVOO, and honey. At lunch, with salads, soups, fish. In the afternoon I make sugar free snacks with EVOO. Any time of day is perfect!” (LIÁ). Ellie Tragakes seems to agree: “Every morning I begin the day with a slice of toasted whole wheat bread drenched in ACAIA olive oil, topped with cheese, tomatoes and oregano. This is delicious beyond words, not to mention how nutritious it is. Beyond that, I pour ACAIA olive oil over anything edible, with the sole exception of ice cream and cakes. Though I should add that one can bake superb cakes using EVOO rather than butter” (Hellenic Agricultural Enterprises). One certainly can bake cakes with olive oil—try it. Vasiliki Maraveli even embraces the combination of olive oil and ice cream. “Olive oil is a treasure, and it is unique, in whatever way you combine it. Which other fat can be used from ice cream to cocktail? We prefer it raw on toasted bread with oregano and on boiled potatoes with fresh onion and coarse salt” (ALSEA-Sigounas Olive Mill). While it is true that some of the beneficial components of extra virgin olive oil are richest in fresh, raw EVOO, scientific studies have also shown that there are benefits to cooking with olive oil, as Greeks do daily. Extra virgin olive oil is commonly used in Greek stewing, sautéing, frying, and baking; it is a good, healthy choice for almost everything. Those interested in olive oil’s wonderful healthiness, as George Mathiopoulos points out, may “choose to take the recommended 25 ml for the health benefit with a spoon daily,” or they can use it as part of their Mediterranean diet. “We find that our olive oil pairs best with earthy green flavors such as lentils, beans, and other legumes” (Greek Olive Estate). Such dishes are so popular in Greece that they have their own category: “ladera,” or “oily,” since the pulses, green beans, peas, cauliflower, spinach and rice, meats, and other foods are swimming in the olive oil that makes them tasty and adds important nutrients during cooking as well as finishing. Consider the olive oil you are using at any given time, the reason you are using it, and the foods you are preparing, and experiment with various choices. Use more than one EVOO, just as you use more than one wine, depending on the meal and the occasion. Extra virgin olive oil offers almost endless possibilities for health benefits and flavor enhancement; explore them in your kitchen! For more recipes with olive oil, see Greek Liquid Gold. By Lisa Radinovsky “Originally published on Greek Liquid Gold: Authentic Extra Virgin Olive Oil (greekliquidgold.com). See that site for recipes with olive oil, photos from Greece, and olive oil news and information.”  RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)

Report: The Greek town where each house boasts a private beach (video)

Squeezed between the mountains and the deep Corinthian Sea, the Greek town of Derveni, in Peloponnese, Greece, is highlighted in a spectacular drone video. One of its principal characteristics is that its coastal houses and flats are flanked by the old national road to the south and have direct access to the pebbled seashore to the north. Along its four kilometer (one mile) coastline, houses have direct and, mainly, private access to their own portion of the beach. Derveni’s population stands at 1,080 (2011 census) but rises dramatically during the holiday season and many of the houses and flats are second residencies for people living chiefly in Athens or Patras. The northern coastline of the Peloponnese has been afflicted by erosion and sea level rises for many years. In the region of Derveni, on February 29 2012, generalized erosion of the coastal zone was observed on account of seabed subsidence along the coastline, damaging dozens of houses and business premises. Read more at greekreporter.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)

Ancient mummification workshop unearthed near Giza pyramids in Egypt

A mummification workshop, going back to ancient Egypt near the country’s Giza pyramids has been unearthed after 2,500 years and includes a gold cast mask, featuring a mask-making technique that was only followed by ancient Greeks. The discovery of the workshop along with a shaft, used as a communal burial place, was made at the Saqqara necropolis in Memphis, the first capital of ancient Egypt. Memphis, a Unesco World Heritage Site, is home to a wide range of temples and tombs including s the three renowned Giza pyramids. The latest discovery, announced at a press conference on Saturday, dates back to the Saite-Persian Period, from 664-404 BC. The site, which is situated  south of the Unas pyramid, was last excavated more than 100 years ago. Archaeologists also discovered a large collection of pottery vessels, bowls and measuring cups, which they hope will unveil more about the mummification process. “We are in front of a goldmine of information about the chemical composition of these oils,” noted Ramadan Hussein, the head of the German-Egyptian mission. Among the artefacts found were fragments of mummy masks, jars used to keep the organs removed from the dead during mummification as well as an array of ancient pottery. Gilded silver mask on the face of a mummy Archaeologists also located a gilded silver mask on the face of a mummy in a badly-damaged wooden coffin. Hussein said: “The finding of this mask could be called a sensation.” According to him, the technique of making the mask is also interesting. The ornaments and the way the gold cast is on silver is excellent. “Such a technique was not widespread in Egypt,” Hussein says. “This was more of a technique that was followed in ancient Greece”. “Very few masks of precious metals have been preserved to the present day, because the tombs of most Ancient Egyptian dignitaries were looted in ancient times,” he added. Many finds will be displayed at the Grand Egyptian Museum, the first phase of which is expected to be inaugurated later this year. Read more at greekcitytimes.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Ricardo Liberato License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Greek painter transforms abandoned buildings on island of Crete

A Greek painter has given new life to abandoned buildings in remote villages of the island of Crete, in Greece. Voula Ladoukaki has taken upon the task of transforming buildings that are left in ruins across the prefecture of Heraklion. In an interview with the Athens News Agency she notes that she began her project in May, starting from the small village of Antiskari. “At Antiskari there are many dilapidated houses which were spoling the image of the nearby beautiful beach,” she explained. With the help of local volunteers she painted nine buildings before moving on to more nearby villages. Ladoukaki clarifies she always consults the property owners before she proceeds with the makeover. Nevertheless, as she points out, most buildings in the area have no owners as they have been abandoned for decades. Read more at greekreporter.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: C messier License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Major project of Crete island power interconnection is put off

The major project of the electrical interconnection between Crete and Greece’s mainland grid is under threat after the sudden end to the cooperation between the Independent Power Transmission Operator (ADMIE) and the EuroAsia Interconnector for the project’s joint construction. Thursday’s meeting of the parties involved and a European Commission representative, held at the Regulatory Authority for Energy (RAE), failed to bridge the gap between ADMIE and EuroAsia, leading to a rift that brings to an end the collaboration originally sealed with a memorandum of understanding last October. The Commission representative effectively signaled the end of the cooperation process, noting that the development was a particularly unpleasant surprise, for the project forms part of the power interconnection of Greece, Cyprus and Israel and had been included among the European Union’s Projects of Common Interest. Now RAE has a two-month period to decide whether it will proceed with a direct concession of the project to ADMIE with a binding timetable, or call a tender seeking investors. According to sources, RAE intends to make its decisions far earlier, probably within next week, as there has already been a big delay. Read more at ekathimerini.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: NASA Earth Observatory License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)