Author Archives: Stefanie Valentic

Six Preventive Measures After a Weather Disaster [Photo Gallery]

What should employers do following Hurricane Michael? OSHA provided recommendations. On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Hurricane Michael made landfall at Mexico Beach, Fla., completely devastating the Florida Panhandle as it began its trek north. Rainfall, flash flooding and tornadoes were reported as a result of the category 4 storm. Now, businesses, residents and families are working to clean up the mess left behind. "Employers and employees must be aware and trained to deal with the hazards involved in storm cleanup," said OSHA Regional Administrator Kurt Petermeyer. "The risk of injuries, illnesses, and fatalities can be minimized with knowledge, safe work practices, and appropriate personal protective equipment." Recovery efforts after the storm may involve hazards related to restoring electricity and communications, debris removal, repairing damage from water intrusion, roof repair, and tree trimming. Only individuals with proper training, equipment, and experience should conduct recovery and cleanup activities, OSHA says. Click through the slideshow to see what recommendations OSHA provides post hurricane and other weather disasters. Let's block ads! (Why?)

Double Vision: Selecting the Right PPE for Your Workers

Flying objects. Tools. Particles. Chemicals. More than 90 percent of eye injuries could be prevented with the use of goggles, face shields, safety glasses or full-face respirators, according to The Vision Council. “Whether it’s a chemical or a liquid or a metal foreign body, whether it’s from cutting metal or a baseball, everything needs to be considered when we’re protecting against eye injuries,” says Dr. Rachel Bishop, chief of the National Eye Institute’s consult service. The impact of eye injuries to businesses is an estimated $300 million annually, which includes medical bills compensation and downtime, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Despite the high price tag to companies and risk for permanent vision damage for workers, employers still face the daunting task of getting workers to wear the proper eye protection. A FOGGY ISSUE Part of Dr. Bishop’s experience included providing ophthalmic care to thousands of soldiers who were deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq. She says the biggest cause of those soldiers not wearing their PPE was due to fogging or other wear issues. “If you’re a soldier in the ­ field in Iraq and you’re wearing eye protection and [the goggles] get foggy, you just can’t do your job,” she explains. “Goggles work for protecting the eye, but they’re more challenging for maintaining good vision under dif­ficult work environments. It’s not the easiest thing to ­find the perfect level of eye protection.” The Vision Council corroborates Dr. Bishop’s ­ first-hand account. In a brief published in conjunction with the American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP), the organization cites research about factors that influence why workers choose not to wear proper eye protection. The study, which included manufacturing, construction, service and retail workers, found that 100 percent of participants did not wear personal protective eyewear due to fogging issues, and more than half (55 percent) said that an antifogging solution would increase usage. “By taking the necessary measures to reduce the fogging of protective eyewear, employers will likely see an increase in compliance with eye protection recommendations and increased worker safety,” The Vision Council says. Some injuries can happen even when wearing the proper eye protection. Dr. Bishop pointed to one incident in which a patient had a piece of metal slip under his/her safety goggles despite use. “Even when you’re wearing the proper eye protection, it’s still not perfect, but it blocks a lot of projectile injuries to the eye,” she cautions. “Where employers need to be aware is that sometimes the work environment makes it challenging to use certain types of eyewear.” TAKING ACTION Eye injuries can be deceiving. While damage could seem minor, failing to take immediate action could result in vision loss and additional lost work days. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends the following basic steps for all eye injuries: Do not touch, rub or apply pressure to the eye. Do not try to remove the object stuck in the eye. Do not apply ointment or medication to the eye. See a doctor as soon as possible, preferably an ophthalmologist. In the case of chemical contact, the first effort is to rinse the eye with water. The goal is to dilute and rinse away the chemical that makes contact with delicate eye tissues, Dr. Bishop recommends. In addition, special caution should be taken to not rub the eye during cleaning. If it’s grass or sawdust, Dr. Bishop says to take the nearest water source, such as a bottle, and to rinse the eye and seek medical attention as soon as possible. Again, caution should be taken to not apply pressure or contact. “You don’t want to touch the eye. You don’t want to press something on the surface, maybe it’s lodged part of the way in, further into the eye,” she says. Eye injuries that involve lodged objects require extra care. The first step is to find something to cover the eye so there is protection from further damage, should the eye be bumped or touched. “You’re creating a cage around it so that the person can get urgent care,” she says. “This way, it can be removed in a controlled setting rather than pushing the object in further and scrambling the contents of the eye.” Delaying medical attention can cause the damaged areas to worsen and could result in permanent vision loss or blindness. “At the end of the day most eye injuries really are preventable,” Dr. Bishop says. “For the workers doing the task, if something’s not working for you, speak up. Let your manager know. Tell them that you can’t do what you need to do with the gear you have.” AN EYE ON TREATMENTEye injuries require immediate medical treatment to prevent vision loss. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommendsseeking medical attention as soon as possible if the following signs are observed: The person has obvious pain ortrouble seeing. The person has a cut or torn eyelid. One eye does not move as wellas the other. One eye sticks out comparedto the other. The eye has an unusual pupilsize or shape. There is blood in the clear partof the eye. The person has something inthe eye or under the eyelidthat can’t be easily removed. In addition, the organization states that attempting to treat a serious eye injury on your own could result in further damage or permanent vision loss. Let's block ads! (Why?)

Sincerely Stefanie: Preventing Workplace Bullying

October is Bullying Prevention Month. While most media outlets focus on schools and children, bullying runs rampant in the workplace as well. The Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI), which works to raise awareness of the issue, says workers are targeted not because they are viewed as loners or weaklings. Instead, a worker, manager or supervisor might bully a fellow coworker because that person is viewed as a threat in their minds. Who is considered a threat? WBI research discovered that targets are considered independent, more technically skilled than their bullies, better liked, more social, ethical, honest and non-confrontational. In other words, those who contribute to a positive workplace culture typically are the ones who are often bullied. In his session titled, “The Safety Professional’s Role in Preventing Workplace Bullying,” part of the Safety and Risk Management Track for the 2018 Safety Leadership Conference in Louisville on Nov.6-8, I. David Daniels will address this topic. “Creating a safe workplace involves more than the prevention of slips, trips, falls and other physical injuries,” he said in a recent Q&A with EHS Today. “An environment where incivility, hazing, bullying, harassment and violence are present is a real and present threat to the safety of employees in a workplace setting. Safety professionals have an important role in preventing and responding to bullying, hazing, harassment and violence in the workplace. In fact, many of the same techniques that are used to prevent other safety hazards can be important in addressing what can escalate into workplace violence.” I attended his session at the 2017 National Safety Congress in Indianapolis about preventing bullying, harassment and violence. During the session, Daniels provided insight about how managers and supervisors should employ a number of prevention strategies to encourage a positive company culture that does not foster bullying, harassment or violence. The methods Daniels spoke about include: • Promoting sincere, open and timely communication among managers, employees, organizations. • Offering support for professional development. • Fostering a family-friendly work environment. • Promoting quality of life (job satisfaction). • Maintaining mechanisms for complaints and concerns and allow them to be expressed in a non-judgmental forum that includes timely feedback to initiators of bullying and harassment. • Maintaining impartial and consistent discipline for employees who exhibit improper conduct and poor performance. (EHS Today's 2018 Safety Leadership Conference and America’s Safest Companies Awards Program will take place Nov. 6-8 in Louisville, KY at the Hyatt Regency Louisville. This event is designed to share best leadership, risk management, compliance and safety practices with EHS professionals hoping to achieve world-class safety at their companies. The conference features 24 sessions across four performance tracks; Safety & Risk Management, Compliance, Construction and Safety Technology.) Let's block ads! (Why?)

October 2018 Safety Innovations [Photo Gallery]

View the latest products from EHS Today's October issue. EHS Today's print edition highlights the latest personal protective equipment, software and safety products ranging from footwear to training. Our October issue features innovations from Cementex, Industrial Scientific and Nightstick. To view product descriptions and photos, use the arrows to move back and forth through the slideshow. Let's block ads! (Why?)

SLC 2018 Q&A: Six Leading Indicators that Elite Contractors Can’t Live Without

While lagging indicators still place in safety, using leading indicators in conjunction can drive continuous improvement. Steve Wiltshire, ABC safety director, will tell 2018 Safety Leadership Conference attendees what performance measures are leading contractors on a path to world class safety. Related: Join Us at Safety Leadership Conference 2018 - Save 15% with the code EHSTODAY15!EHS Today recently asked Wiltshire about his session, titled "Six Leading Indicators that Elite Contractors Can’t Live Without," which is part of the Construction Track. EHS Today: Can you offer us a description of your presentation and how it relates to safety leadership? Wiltshire: These six leading indicators are consistently used by the best construction firms in America. See how the relationship between the C-suite and employees drives a successful safety process. EHS Today: Why is the topic of your presentation of interest to you and why is it important to SLC attendees? Wiltshire: The topic illustrates simple, practical steps a firm can take to begin their journey to world class safety. EHS Today: What are the takeaways you hope to leave with attendees? Wiltshire: Beginning the journey to world class safety starts with one step and all of these practical methods can be initiated very easily…with the right leadership commitment. EHS Today: What do you think are some of the most pressing EHS and risk management issues facing corporate leaders and safety professionals in 2018 and beyond?  Wiltshire: The demonstration of authentic, intentional safety leadership. EHS Today: How will this session help attendees be a better resource for their employees and company? Wiltshire: Attendees will see, using statistical evidence, the value of implementing practical safety processes that can transform their safety culture. (EHS Today's 2018 Safety Leadership Conference and America’s Safest Companies Awards Program will take place Nov. 6-8 in Louisville, KY at the Hyatt Regency Louisville. This event is designed to share best leadership, risk management, compliance and safety practices with EHS professionals hoping to achieve world-class safety at their companies. The conference features 24 sessions across four performance tracks; Safety & Risk Management, Compliance, Construction and Safety Technology.) Let's block ads! (Why?)

SLC 2018 Q&A: EnPro's Journey – A Culture of Safety Ownership

How does a company become an America's Safest Company? At this year's Safety Leadership Conference, Joe Wheatley from EnPro Industries will tell attendees about how the industrial products manufacturer has been successful in implementing a robust system driven by a culture of caring, sharing and learning within the workplace.  Related: Join Us at Safety Leadership Conference 2018 - Save 15% with the code EHSTODAY15!The session, titled "EnPro's Journey to Becoming One of America's Safest Companies: A Culture of Safety Ownership" is part of SLC's Safety and Risk Management track. Wheatley recently told EHS Today more about the presentation in a Q&A. EHS Today: Why is the topic of your presentation of interest to you and why is it important to SLC attendees? Joe Wheatley: Safety ownership is the key driver when it comes to eliminating workplace injuries. Ownership of safety goes way beyond the EHS manager. Most EHS managers are overwhelmed just with the goal of reducing injuries. They need tools to help to develop safety leaders. That starts with safety ownership and it starts with changing that one word in our mindset – to go from reducing injuries to eliminating injuries.EHS Today: Please share an example of a personal or professional experience you’ve had related to safety leadership or the topic of your presentation. Wheatley: Leadership in general in business is in short supply. It’s difficult to get beyond managing and truly lead a company or a division or a plant or a department to a new higher performance level. I recently had a benchmark visit with a company that I really admire for its leadership development and corporate culture. That company has great morale and collaboration and was just at a whole other level. But their workplace safety was surprisingly poor. Their leaders have a mindset of injury prevention and reduction, but not elimination. And leading in safety is different than leading in operations. In this presentation, attendees will learn those differences and how to change the mindset and drive a new safety culture. EHS Today: What are the takeaways you hope to leave with attendees? Wheatley: Executives will implement systems to fix problems and make improvements. EHS managers will use tools like Behavior Based Safety or Job Safety Analysis to reduce injuries. But without first laying the groundwork of safety ownership and leadership, those systems and programs fade away and you’re back to square one. We want attendees to learn what it takes to develop a sustainable safety culture of zero injuries, and that starts with who really owns safety. EHS Today: What do you think are some of the most pressing EHS and risk management issues facing corporate leaders and safety professionals in 2018 and beyond? Wheatley: The biggest question is, do corporate leaders and safety professionals truly care enough about the people they work with to make sure they are all safe physically and emotionally in the place where they spend most of their lives? Because it really is life or death. We’re negotiating with executives and safety professionals at different companies all the time about directly working with them to help them change their safety cultures. Some do and some don’t, they are all at different stages in their journeys. The point is, while we’re having conference calls back and forth for a couple months, we’ve had 3 companies in the last 9 months experience deaths at their facilities, while we were in that negotiation process with them. We’re talking deaths, not even lost-time injuries. So every day we debate cost and production issues when it comes to safety, someone can die. Is safety really a core value that we’re going to back up with action? That takes a different kind of leadership. EHS Today: How will this session help attendees be a better resource for their employees and company? Wheatley: Attendees will get some ideas and tools they can take back with them for safety leadership, but more importantly we want them to catch the vision that injuries can be eliminated, and a sustainable, positive workplace safety culture is achievable. Then they will take that first step to being safety leaders and truly better resources for the people who trust us with their lives. (EHS Today's 2018 Safety Leadership Conference and America’s Safest Companies Awards Program will take place Nov. 6-8 in Louisville, KY at the Hyatt Regency Louisville. This event is designed to share best leadership, risk management, compliance and safety practices with EHS professionals hoping to achieve world-class safety at their companies. The conference features 24 sessions across four performance tracks; Safety & Risk Management, Compliance, Construction and Safety Technology.) Let's block ads! (Why?)

Sincerely Stefanie: Scooter Safety

On Saturday, Aug. 18, a pedestrian utilizing a rented electric scooter was struck and killed in Cleveland, Ohio. This is only one of many emerging incidents that has caused rental companies to pull scooters from busy city streets.The service works as such: A scooter rental company plops down a handful of motorized scooters in a large city and expects responsible riders to operate the vehicles. However, the novelty of the service draws inexperienced riders and, coupled with limited bike lanes and distracted/impaired driving, this is an accident waiting to happen. Rental company Bird provides instructions about where to use scooters, mainly:• Care for pedestrians. No riding on sidewalks unless local law requires or permits — it endangers members of our community who want to walk freely. We’re all in this together, so let’s be good neighbors and look out for one another.• Ride in bike lanes or close to the right curb. Many people using the scooters disregard these instructions, choosing to ride on the sidewalk. This creates safety issues for pedestrians as well as the driver.Bird also mentions that free helmets are available. However, they must be requested through the app and the user must pay shipping. The helmets take about a week to arrive, and unless the rider is willing to wait to use the scooter, this completely negates the purpose of having personal protective equipment available. A safer solution would be to have a central location or attendant who would encourage or require helmet use and provide proper instructions. While the bottom line is important, rider safety should be a priority. The company’s rules of the road say: You must be 18+ years old with a valid driver’s license. Bird is fun with friends, but only one rider per Bird is permitted. Follow all traffic rules including street signs and stop signs. Use caution at crosswalks. While these seem like obvious precautions, rental companies are missing key safety issues by assuming riders are just going to stop and read these instructions before operating a scooter. The city of Santa Monica, Calif., where Bird is headquartered, reminds riders about the state’s laws: You can only ride if you have a valid driver’s license or instruction permit. Wearing a helmet is required for all ages. You must ride by yourself, and not with any passengers. You must ride on the road, never on the sidewalk. You may not park on the sidewalk in the way of pedestrian traffic. You must not ride at night unless the motorized scooter is equipped with proper lighting equipment, including a front light source which is visible from the front and sides, and reflectors. While Bird currently is valued at $2 billion, how much value are these emerging companies actually putting into safety? The company already pulled its scooters from some cities, citing permit issues. If scooter rental companies cannot do the research to see how traffic patterns are affected or work with city officials to go through the proper steps, how do inexperienced riders know that these companies are putting safety first? Let's block ads! (Why?)

The Issue with Stress

Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle examined the working conditions of the slaughterhouse industry, leading to revolutionary changes in the way American companies treat their employees. While workplace conditions have significantly improved with governmental oversight, legislation and OSHA, Americans in some industries still are feeling the psychological and physical effects of a negative work environment. The American Psychological Association (APA) lists a number of factors that tend to go hand-in-hand with work-related stress, among them: low salaries, excessive workloads, few opportunities for growth or advancement, work that isn’t engaging or challenging, lack of social support, not having enough control over job-related decisions, and conflicting demands or unclear performance expectations. Micki Siegel de Hernandez, health & safety director at the Communications Workers of America, discussed these factors with EHS Today as well as what employers can do to recognize and reduce workplace stress. What causes workplace stress?Sigel de Hernandez: Workplace stress could be caused by a number of issues. Most often it has to do with: • how work is organized • the demands of the workplace • the kind of control or lack of control that workers may have in their particular job • hazards that are in the workplace• dangers that are in the workplace.It also could be caused by psychological factors and issues around the organization itself, and the kind of reaction that affects that stress can have particular chronic stress. What are some of the physical and mental issues that could arise?Sigel de Hernandez: When we’re talking about occupational stress, it can affect people in so many ways. It can cause disease; it can cause chronic conditions —diseases like heart disease and stroke. It’s related to musculoskeletal conditions. It can cause chronic pain conditions. It can cause headaches. It can cause lack of concentration. It can affect the respiratory system, the endocrine system and hormones, and it can also affect the nervous system. It can lead to reduced immune response, and the list goes on and on. How does chronic stress affect workplace safety?Sigel de Hernandez: For workers who are chronically stressed, they may also be suffering from anxiety as a result of that. It affects sleep. Depending upon what the stressor is, they’re more prone to accidents or to injuries if they’re constantly in a stressed state. There had been fatalities that had occurred as a result of that, strictly because of the number of hours worked.Because of the demand and the physiological response in the body, people just start breaking down, It affects a person’s ability to think and to make decisions, good decisions that you would make if you weren’t in that stressed state. This isn’t just in the United States. In Japan they have a word for this. It’s called Koroshi, which is death by overwork, and it has to do with the way certain industries are structured and just excessive overtime of workers in those industries and death – that’s the overwork part, sudden heart attacks, stroke and also suicides as a result of those workplace conditions.How can companies integrate different programs to reduce stress in the workplace? Sigel de Hernandez: There needs to be a focus on the workplace conditions that are causing stress. Occupational stress is causing companies a lot of money as well as affecting employee health, and some of those costs are hidden. It’s not as easy to associate those costs, things like absenteeism for example, or a rise in healthcare cost with what is actually going on in the workplace, but I think that it does. It affects the bottom line as well as affecting the employees that work there. So, I think when the employers really want to reduce their cost and also make the workplace a more humane place, and protect people, and reduce injuries, reduce health effects caused by stress, then you really have to be able to look at the conditions at work.It’s not just a question of training managers or training supervisors. A company has to be willing to look at the kinds of demands and pressures – the procedures of a particular workplace and involve workers in decisions about how work gets structured. There are so many industries and occupations where the demand is so high.When it exceeds a person’s capacity or a workforce’s capacity to really deal with stress on a regular basis, those are the kinds of things where you start seeing health problems, and you also start seeing effects on productivity, absenteeism, illness and a potential rise in workplace accidents. How can a company train its managers and supervisors to recognize stress?Sigel de Hernandez: Managers and supervisors can be trained to look at some of those clues that exist that there are some underlying problems, but there has to be an honest way of figuring out what that underlying problem is. Often with occupational stress, the focus is put on the individual worker and in developing programs to help people cope in a workplace wellness program. The focus really should be put on what are those elements that are creating that stressful environment because unless you get rid of those, the conditions that are causing the problems, then you’ll never fix the problem, and you’ll never really have a workplace that’s as healthy as it should be. It’s not about an individual worker; it’s not about just breathing deeply, or relaxing. All of those things are fine, but it’s really those production issues, the demands which may be unreasonable for people, excessive overtime for example — all of those things can create chronic stress in the people in that workplace.  Let's block ads! (Why?)

SLC 2018 Q&A: Pushing Back on OSHA Inspections

Between walkarounds, interviews and document requests, OSHA inspections can be daunting and drawn out. Knowing your rights as an employer can help you push back during the process and protect your business, says Travis Vance, Fisher Phillips attorney and speaker at the 2018 Safety Leadership Conference from Nov. 6-8 in Louisville. Related: Join Us at Safety Leadership Conference 2018 - Save 15% with the code EHSTODAY15!Vance and Collin Warren, APM chief compliance director and general counsel will guide attendees through what is expected and what can be done to make sure the inspection process runs smoothly. Learn more about the session titled, “We’re Not Gonna’ Take It: Pushing Back on OSHA Inspections," in the Compliance Track, through EHS Today's Q&A with Vance. EHS Today: Can you offer us a description of your presentation and how it relates to safety leadership? Vance: This will be an interactive discussion of OSHA inspections, the government’s tactics during inspections, including walkarounds, witness interviews, and document requests,  and employers’ rights following the seminal Mar-Jac Poultry case. If safety leaders have an understanding of what their company’s rights are during an OSHA inspections, they will be more effective in defending OSHA citations and protecting workers. EHS Today: Why is the topic of your presentation of interest to you and why is it important to SLC attendees? Vance: It’s important to me because it’s what I do every day. I’ve handled OSHA inspections all over the country and each one is unique and presents a new challenge. I find that many safety leaders don’t fully understand their rights during OSHA inspections and this presentation will help them protect their brand and preserve business opportunities. EHS Today: Please share an example of a personal or professional experience you’ve had related to safety leadership or the topic of your presentation. Vance: I’ve handled OSHA inspections that involved 6 inspectors and where OSHA was on-site for 26 days. I use the content of this presentation to assist employers in protecting their workers and to learn how to raise their rights, professionally, during an OSHA inspection. EHS Today: What are the takeaways you hope to leave with attendees? Vance: After the presentation, the attendees will: Know how to respond to an accident to prepare for an OSHA inspection and third-party claim; Have a plan in place to prepare for an OSHA inspection; Know their rights if and when OSHA arrives; Understand the ramifications of issues, including matters relating to employee testimony, arising during an OSHA inspection; Be able to put procedures in place to enhance employee safety; Understand how to comply with OSHA’s new anti-retaliation rules; and Have a greater understanding of the interplay of OSHA with other types of laws and litigation.  EHS Today: What do you think are some of the most pressing EHS and risk management issues facing corporate leaders and safety professionals in 2018 and beyond? Vance: Being prepared for not only OSHA inspections, but third-party/vendor/customer audits which often go beyond safety issues. These audits will not only require employers to keep their workers safe, but could be an obstacle to preserving a company’s business opportunities. EHS Today: How will this session help attendees be a better resource for their employees and company? Vance: As noted, many safety leaders don’t fully know their rights during an OSHA inspection. This presentation will not only prevent or minimize OSHA citations and penalties, but preserve business opportunities for the company. (EHS Today's 2018 Safety Leadership Conference and America’s Safest Companies Awards Program will take place Nov. 6-8 in Louisville, KY at the Hyatt Regency Louisville. This event is designed to share best leadership, risk management, compliance and safety practices with EHS professionals hoping to achieve world-class safety at their companies. The conference features 24 sessions across four performance tracks; Safety & Risk Management, Compliance, Construction and Safety Technology.) Let's block ads! (Why?)

SLC 2018 Q&A: Don’t Crowd Out Safety and Overload Your Workforce

Information overload could cause problems when it comes to educating workers about safety. Bo Cooper and Kathleen Dobson, safety directors at Alberici Constructors, will talk to attendees about how simplify your safety messages at the 2018 Safety Leadership Conference in Louisville. Related: Join Us at Safety Leadership Conference 2018 - Save 15% with the code EHSTODAY15!“Don’t Crowd Out Safety and Overload Your Workforce With Too Much Information,” which is in the Construction Truck, will examine basic adult learning principles and tools to educate workers. In a Q&A with EHS Today, Dobson tells readers what to expect during the discussion which is part of the Construction track. EHS Today: Can you offer us a description of your presentation and how it relates to safety leadership?  Dobson: Safety directors/leaders are often the most guilty of overloading people with too much information. We create problems with too much information and it’s often difficult to overcome them without learning basic adult learning principles and simplifying the way we educate our workforce. EHS Today: Why is the topic of your presentation of interest to you and why is it important to SLC attendees? Dobson: We find that we overload people with rules, policies and procedures and information that is often difficult to retain – when we ask people, we learned that they can recall three or four things effectively, so the training we now emphasize is blocked out in segments of three or four. The “pick three” methodology is a good example of allowing workers to participate in their own safe work and gives them an opportunity at the beginning of their shift to identify and focus on the three most dangerous activities or situations that they could face that day. EHS Today: Please share an example of a personal or professional experience you’ve had related to safety leadership or the topic of your presentation. Dobson: On a project where I was a two-day visitor, I was subjected to a 7 ½ hour orientation which included “17 steps to the gate” – 17 rules that, if not followed, would result in immediate dismissal from the project. They were not posted except near the orientation trailer, and they were not provided, except in a 50-page orientation packet. Even as a safety professional, I found myself constantly looking over my shoulder to see if anyone would approach me and tell me that I violated one of these cardinal rules.   EHS Today: What are the takeaways you hope to leave with attendees?  Dobson: The use of simple tools to minimize overload in orientation, the “pick three” methodology for simplifying directions and providing focus and how to use emotional connections to keep people focused. EHS Today: What do you think are some of the most pressing EHS and risk management issues facing corporate leaders and safety professionals in 2018 and beyond? Dobson: In EHS:  New technology: how does safety interact with drones, BIM, phone applications, virtual reality, microlearning Dealing with violence – active shooters Old adversaries and issues – silica management, crane safety, opioids Relationships – management of change, OSHA (focus areas – heat, falls, safe workplaces) ISO 45001 and other OHSMS In risk management: Case management and keeping workers at work. Looking at leading indicators rather than EMR, DART, RIR and getting owner/clients to “buy-in” to looking at the here and now of a safety program rather than what happened Opioids  EHS Today: How will this session help attendees be a better resource for their employees and company? Dobson: We hope it will help them understand that keeping things simple is often safer, and that’s something they can take to the bank. (EHS Today's 2018 Safety Leadership Conference and America’s Safest Companies Awards Program will take place Nov. 6-8 in Louisville, KY at the Hyatt Regency Louisville. This event is designed to share best leadership, risk management, compliance and safety practices with EHS professionals hoping to achieve world-class safety at their companies. The conference features 24 sessions across four performance tracks; Safety & Risk Management, Compliance, Construction and Safety Technology.) Let's block ads! (Why?)