Author Archives: Santorini Hotels

Mediterranean Film Institute workshops will kick off in Greek island of Nisyros

Following 22 years of success, the Mediterranean Film Institute (MFI), in defiance of the challenges posed by the coronavirus, is once again organizing the European program for the development of screenplays and film projects, MFI Script 2 Film Workshops, int.ert.gr reports. In accordance to the guidelines of the European Commission (11/6/2020) to limit unnecessary travel within the EU to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and with a personal sense of responsibility towards all involved parties, the organizers have decided to implement the first round of workshops in Nisyros, live for Greek participants and online for the rest, between July 20 and August 2. The possibilities of the digitalization will be utilized to the fullest (group and private online meetings, masterclasses, lectures, synchronized and asynchronous online forums and targeted counseling) in order to equip the participating creators with all the required tools to implement them. It should be noted that, in spite of the general uncertainty, the number and level of applications was extremely high, making the choice difficult. Specifically, out of 103 applications and 166 creators (screenwriters, directors and producers) from 28 countries (including Cuba Zambia and Argentina for the first time), 60 filmmakers were selected with 25 film scripts, 3 TV series projects, 6 documentaries that are under development and 6 trainee assistant professors. The MFI Script 2 Film Workshops are supported by the European Union’s Creative Europe / MEDIA program, the Ministry of Culture and Sports, the General Secretariat for the Aegean and Island Policy and the Municipalities of Nisyros and Rhodes, ERT and the National Center for Audiovisual Media and Communication (EKOME S.A.) The Mediterranean Film Institute cooperates with the Thessaloniki Film Festival and the Crossroads Production Forum, the Thessaloniki Documentary Festival and the Thessaloniki Doc Market, Sofia Meetings, Meetings On The Bridge, Nyon’s Documentary Festival Visions du Reel, the DOK Industry, the Fair DOK Leipzig, the Los Angeles Greek Film Festival, the Film Department of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, the Stavrakos School and IEK AKMI. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Karelj Let's block ads! (Why?)

Finland opens borders for Greeks and Cypriots on July 13

Finland today announced the opening of its borders on July 13 to tourists from 17 European countries with low rates of coronavirus infection, including Greece and Cyprus, protothema.gr reports. On July 13, border measures will be lifted for states that have been recording infection rates below eight per 100,000 population for the past 14 days, the government noted. Furthermore, from this date, business and other travel that is deemed “necessary” is permitted between Finland and – among other states – Algeria, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Tunisia, and China. The country has already opened its borders since June 15 to the Baltic states and most of the Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Norway, Iceland) – except for Sweden, which still has an infection rate well over the regional average. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Fibonacci  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Syntagma and Panepistimio Athens metro stations to close today at 18:00

The Syntagma and Panepistimio metro stations will close on Thursday at 18:00, at the orders of the police, due to the rallies in downtown Athens, ANA reports. Trains will pass through these two stations without stopping. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: GianniM Let's block ads! (Why?)

Travel + Leisure: Greek hotels and islands win World’s Best Awards for 2020

The Greek island of Paros is the top island in Europe, according to Travel + Leisure. The well-known travel magazine published its lists of the world’s best 2020 Awards, based on the votes of its readers. The vote closed on March 2, shortly before the start of the global coronavirus travel lockdown measures, and the results represent the experiences gained by travelers prior to the pandemic. Greek hotels, islands, and destinations won significant international distinctions. More specifically, three Greek islands, Paros (2nd place, score 90.55), Milos (3rd place, score 90.33) and Crete (15th place, score 88.20) are among the 25 best in the world, followed by Rhodes and the Dodecanese (10th place, score 86.63), Santorini (11th place, score 86.37), Corfu and the Ionian Islands (18th place, score 84.33) and Mykonos (20th place, score 82.28). Based on the vote, the top resorts in the country are as follows: 1. Canaves Oia Epitome | Score: 98.40 2. Katikies Santorini | Score: 97.62 3. Canaves Oia Boutique Hotel | Score: 95.62 4. Katikies Mykonos | Score: 95.58 5. Grace Santorini, Auberge Resorts Collection | Score: 94.83 6. Andronis Luxury Suites | Score: 94.67 7. Andronis Boutique Hotel | Score: 94.60 8. Bill & Coo Hotels | Score: 93.63 9. Mystique, a Luxury Collection Hotel | Score: 92.73 10. Blue Palace, a Luxury Collection Resort and Spa, Κρήτη | Score: 92.64 Let's block ads! (Why?)

Greek Finance Ministry projects budget deficit at 7% of GDP

Greece’s fiscal record is being sacrificed to the containment of the recession and unemployment, as the 2020 budget now appears destined for a deficit of 7% of gross domestic product, ekathimerini.com reports. The new support measures announced by the Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis on Friday have a total budget of 3.5 billion euros, with a net additional fiscal cost of €2 billion. The addition of those measures takes the total amount of resources used for combatting the impact of the pandemic on the economy to €14-15 billion, rising to €17 billion in terms of cash impact. According to the revised estimates of the Finance Ministry – which are constantly changing depending on the course of public revenues – this year will close with a general government deficit of over 7%, or €14-15 billion. Around two-thirds of that shortfall will be covered by the increase of the public debt by about €8-10 billion, compared to end-2019, and the utilization of the country’s cash reserves by about €5-7 billion. If those estimates are confirmed, which to a great extent will depend on whether Greece's experiences a second coronavirus wave – the year will close with state debt soaring around €340 billion, while its ratio to the GDP will reach 200%.  Based on the Finance Ministry, while the cost of the new measures comes to €3.5 billion, the fiscal cost comes to €2 billion because the other sum of €1.5 billion practically concerns the redistribution of resources already calculated in the support package but without having been utilized to date. For instance, the state loans program for companies, known as the Deposit To Be Returned scheme, distributed only €600 million in its first phase, against the €1 billion that had been originally set aside for it. Likewise, there has been a smaller-than-expected absorption of funds for the Syn-Ergasia labor subsidy program. The ministry had estimated the primary deficit this year to reach 2% of GDP, against an original target for a primary surplus of 3.5% of GDP, set before the advent of the pandemic. Following the recording of the course of revenues in the April-June period, as well as the increase to the support measures’ budget, the primary deficit is now estimated to exceed 3.5-4% of GDP. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Tilemahos Efthymiadis Let's block ads! (Why?)

World Christian Youth Organisation asks Turkey to respect Hagia Sophia status

The World Christian Youth Organisation called on Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to refrain from converting the Hagia Sophia into a Muslim mosque in a letter they sent to the Turkish leader, stressing the importance of preserving the museum status of the Temple pointing out its enormous value and symbolism as a World Heritage Site for the whole globe, protothema.gr reports. The letter was signed by representatives of the Christian youth from the USA, Canada, Russia, Ukraine, Australia, Germany, Georgia, Armenia, Greece, Cyprus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, Moldova, Belarus, who attended an online meeting on Saturday, July 4, on the subject of Hagia Sophia. “The temple is not just a cultural monument, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it is a compound link, intertwined with historical events that defined the development of the world, various religions, entire peoples and countries. The Hagia Sophia is a World Heritage Site that should remain an attraction for people of different religions,” read the statement.” It goes that the “since 1935, Turkey has been respectful of Christians around the world open with free access the doors of Hagia Sophia, and we ask the Turkish President to maintain the current regime.” “For a Muslim country to have in its territory a Christian holy site, the “Mecca” of all Christians, with respect to the prayers of the faithful of all religions and with worship to the Almighty, and to maintain it with care, this is exactly the apogee the historical role, power and wisdom of a country’s leader,” the letter notes. The letter concludes: “Your decision to retain the status of Hagia Sophia as a museum can be historic. Today, more than ever, people need symbols of peace, serenity, tolerance and multiculturalism. We are on the side of peace and interfaith harmony. We pray for the fate of Hagia Sophia, one of the most important monuments of world culture. Mr. President, by calling on you to maintain the museum status of Hagia Sophia, we call on you to make peace!” RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Arild Vågen Let's block ads! (Why?)

President: Chairing Council of Europe ‘a unique opportunity for Greece’

Greece's chairmanship of the Council of Europe's Committee of Ministers "is a unique opportunity for the country to highlight its European identity and progress and to contribute to forging our joint European progress," President of the Hellenic Republic Katerina Sakellaropoulou said on Wednesday evening, according to ANA. Speaking at the inaugural event of Greece's chairmanship at the Temple of Olympian Zeus in Athens, Sakellaropoulou pointed out that the European Union should not respond to the coronavirus crisis financially or administratively alone, but politically. The pandemic, she noted, "is a major political ordeal that accelerated Europe's problems, both institutional and social, and highlighted the most vulnerable and fragile aspects of our symbiosis."\ RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Andrikkos Let's block ads! (Why?)

27 new cases reported and zero fatalities from Covid-19 in Greece

The National Public Health Organisation (EODY) announced 27 new cases of coronavirus in Greece for the last 24 hours, 14 of which were identified after checks at the country’s entrance gates, protothema.gr reports. The total number of cases is 3589, of which 54.7% are men. No new deaths related to COVID-19 have been reported, and a total of 193 deaths have been reported since the outbreak began. The average age of patients who have passed is 76 years of which 61 (31.8%) women and the rest men. The number of patients treated by intubation is 10 (54.5% men). Their average age is 59 years. 4 (40.0%) are women and the rest are men. 90.0% have an underlying disease or are over 70 years old. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: pixabay.com Let's block ads! (Why?)

25 unescorted refugee children relocated from Greek islands to Portugal

Twenty-five unaccompanied refugee children who were living on Greek islands traveled on Tuesday from Athens to Portugal, where they will be relocated, ANA reports. The children were living on Lesvos, Chios, and Samos islands and are all boys aged 14 to 16 and originate from Afghanistan, Egypt, Gambia, and Iraq. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Marc Mongenet Let's block ads! (Why?)

IATA Director General’s remarks during media briefing on July 7

IATA Director General Alexandre de Juniac made the following remarks during a media briefing on COVID-19 outbreak on July 7, 2020: Good afternoon from Geneva. And thank you for again joining this weekly call. David Rockland has presented some of the insights that we have gleaned from a passenger survey that we have been conducting every few months in this crisis. We are now at the stage where some parts of the world are starting to open-up—Asia and Europe. Understanding the concerns of travelers is important because their willingness to travel will drive the recovery. There are a few key messages that I see in the survey results. The first is that, as we have discussed in this call before, we can expect that this crisis will have a long shadow. Fewer passengers are saying that they will travel again in the first months after the pandemic subsides. In early April 61% said that they would. By early June that fell to 45%. And about two-thirds are seeing less travel in their future—be it for vacation, visiting friends/relatives or business. That is why we continue to remind that relief measures must extend beyond the initial emergency situation. Cost reduction in any form will be critical—reduced charges, taxes, user fees or administrative burdens like slot use it/lose it rules. The second message is that passengers will not travel if governments impose quarantine. This week we have seen the UK and the EU adopt or announce alternatives for what are perceived as low-risk destinations. Other destinations are using testing as a screening methodology—although doing this accurately, quickly and at scale still poses challenges. And, the more countries implement the ICAO Take-off guidelines, the better deterrence we will have to symptomatic travelers because of health checks and declarations. On top of this, airlines are offering flexibility in re-booking, so there is no economic incentive to travel when sick. As testing becomes faster, more accurate, and scalable, pre-travel detection of pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic travelers will become possible, particularly from locations perceived to be higher risk. The science for testing is advancing quickly, but we are still not where we need to be. Of course, there is still the need for general anti-COVID-19 measures in-country—social distancing and contact tracing. Outbreaks involving travelers can be managed using the same methodologies as are used for the general population. We are seeing governments becoming more precise and targeted with these measures to limit the economic damage. The third message is that the ICAO Take-off guidelines go far to addressing travelers’ main concerns for sanitization and human interaction. Masks or face coverings address the difficulty of social distancing in public spaces, including while onboard aircraft. Human interaction is being minimized with contactless processes. And deeper and more frequent sanitization will address critical concerns for many high touch areas, including washrooms and toilets. It is also clear that we have to do better at getting out the message on two fundamental issues: That the aircraft cabin is one of the most controlled environments that people could experience. First, the risk is reduced by screening our symptomatic travelers. Then the air is exchanged with fresh air from outside every two or three minutes on most aircraft. That’s 20 to 30 times more frequently than most office buildings. And HEPA filters take out viruses—including the coronavirus—with each filtration. The second is that, while effective social distancing on board is not possible (even neutralizing the middle seat from the sale does not create the recommended 1m-1.5m distance), a layering of measures will keep travelers safe. Again, we screen out symptomatic travelers before they get to the aircraft and require everybody to wear a mask or facial cover. The masking requirement is the general advice of governments for areas where social distancing is not possible, like public transport. And on top of that, there are several design features that limit the spread of virus-carrying droplets on board. Movement of air forward and aft in the cabin is limited by seatbacks and a ceiling to floor airflow. And with everybody oriented forward, there is limited face-to-face contact. Passenger confidence will not be re-built overnight. We will need to keep reinforcing these messages as we move forward. But I am hopeful that, as people start to travel again, we will build up some momentum. With Europe’s internal borders now largely open, I took my first trip to Paris by plane. Wearing a mask, keeping a distance, and avoiding contact do make travel different. But the level of cooperation among travelers was very high. So the processes worked. With time, travelers will become more used to these measures (although we hope that they will be temporary). And airports and airlines will become even better at managing people flows. Yes, the trip felt different. But the changes were no great hardship. If that is the price for the freedom to travel, count me in! RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: World Trade Organization Let's block ads! (Why?)