Author Archives: Santorini Hotels

Beijing municipality delegation to visit Greek port of Patras

A delegation of the municipality of Beijing will pay a visit to the city of Patras on 19, 20 and 21 August at a Patras municipality invitation, ANA reports. The members of the delegation will meet with the local authority and the board of the Water Supply and Sewerage Municipal Company and will be toured to the city attractions. They will be also briefed on the Patras carnival. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Jean Housen License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Religious Tourism: Panagia Fidiotissa church in Greek island of Kefalonia

The most well-known church of Kefalonia island is that of Panagia Fidiotissa. Every year a phenomenon occurs in the small church in the vicinity of Markopoulos, on the south side of the island as from 6 to the 15th of August, the area is filled with small snakes, friendly to people, with a characteristic soft skin, and the shape of a cross adorning their backs. The snakes of the Virgin Mary are a unique event in the planet, and if you find yourself on the island in August, you should not miss it. If you can’t make it for this event, the miraculous Icon of the Panagia Fidiotissa is also there all year round and also famous for its miracles. The legend of the Virgin says it all began from a bush that was seen burning in Loggos. Approaching to extinguish the fire, they saw that only one tree was burnt and the icon of Virgin was in its roots. They brought it to the village church but the next day the icon was missing. They found it again in the same place and after this, it happened quite a few more times and so they realised that it was a divine sign to build the church of Virgin Lagouvarda. During the years a nunnery, dedicated to the Virgin Mary was created there. Again, according to legend, once upon a time pirates threatened the abbey. After the prayers of the monks, snakes encircled the monastery and repelled the threat. The miracle is repeated every year since then and this is how the appearance of snakes is explained by the tradition. It is also considered a bad sign if the snakes do not appear, which is highlighted by the devastating earthquakes in Kefalonia in 1940 and 1953. In August you can see the snakes making their way through the monastery and wandering among the faithful in the pews and shrines, the image of the Virgin Mary and the Gospel. It is a remarkable fact that and a good reason to choose to spend the 15th of August on the island of Kefalonia. Read more at greekcitytimes.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Spirirokk License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Travel report: Avoid the crowds on these tranquil Greek islands

Beautiful Greek island inhabited by as few as five to as many as around 200 people where the mode of transportation is by donkey, not taxi are presented in the following artticle by greekreporter.com: Marathi This is the island to visit when you want total seclusion from the rest of the planet and to return to the natural beauty of unspoiled Greece. Marathi has only five inhabitants! This picturesque island is only 355 square kilometers located east of Patmos and has an untouched coastline of four kilometers. It was inhabited by the Emilianos family back in 1977, who built a small hotel and restaurant for visitors who stop by the island during the summer months. Irakleia Irakleia is an island with a population of only 141 inhabitants and is ideal for tourists wishing to explore nature and history. The island is 17.795 square kilometers and it is situated between the islands of Naxos and Ios and can be reached by ferries from Athens, Naxos and Paros. This small island may have only just over 100 inhabitants, but it has something really big — the largest caves in the Cyclades! Besides this, the island has a rich history and has been inhabited from early antiquity sine many mysterious rock paintings on the island date back to some 5,000 years. Donousa Want to visit a small island? Check out the Greek island of Donousa which has only 167 inhabitants and an area of 13.75 square kilometers. Donousa is located between Naxos and Amorgos and is one of the smallest islands in the Cyclades group. It can be reached by ferry from Piraeus port near Athens or with a local boat from Naxos or Amorgos. This island remains unspoiled by overtourism and has little means of transportation which means that when you are on Donousa you can walk around, and enjoy the beaches — most which are accessible by foot. Just pack an umbrella since the beaches on this island are not organized and have no proper facilities. Agathonisi Relax on a secluded beach and escape all the crowds this summer by visiting the Greek island of Agathonisi. This small island is located in the northernmost point of the Dodecanese island complex in Greece. A 1920s census recorded that the island had only 80 inhabitants at that time, most of whom were farmers and shepherds. Nowadays, there are 185 inhabitants on the 13.5 square kilometer island. Many people come here for the secluded beaches, and to visit the two quaint villages on the island called Megalo Chorio, or “Big Village,” and Mikro Chorio, meaning “Small Village.” The Municipality of Agathonisi also offers an archipelago of uninhabited offshore islets including Glaros, Kouneli, Nera, and Psathonisio. Read more at greekreporter.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Waldviertler License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Canada’s biggest Street Festival in Greektown over weekend

Canada’s favourite Festival, Greektown’s Taste of the Danforth, is held on this weekend from Friday 10th August- Sunday 12th August 2018. This year marks 25 years of Canada’s not only favourite, but largest street Festival. Taste of Danforth began in 1994 as a celebration of Hellenic cuisine and culture and has grown to become a celebration of both its Greek heritage and the multicultural nature of the City of Toronto. There will be food, food, and more food; what Greek event would it be without 150 great tastes from local vendors! There will also be music, family-friendly entertainment, a sports zone, plate smashing, competitions, activities for the kids and more. Priding itself as a community event, the festival’s profits will be donated to charity, as it happens every year. In the past they have have supported a number of Greek initiatives including donating to the Greek Community of Toronto to help families and schools, SOS Villages — which gives orphans and mothers a home, the Smile of a Child, University of Toronto’s Greek studies program, the Hellenic Canadian Federation of Ontario, Nefeli (theatre and dance), Greek Community of Mississauga, and the Hellenic Home for the Aged. Not to mention, they have donated more than $2 million to Toronto East General Hospital (now renamed Michael Garron Hospital) and supported other charities. The festival’s opening ceremonies on Friday will include a moment of silence for the victims of the shooting as well as acknowledgment of the first responders and civilians who helped the injured. Organisers note they are expecting 1.6 million attendees during the weekend’s festival. Hours: Friday 6pm-11pm, Saturday 12pm-11pm and Sunday 12pm-10pm. Location: The Taste of the Danforth takes place along Danforth Avenue, Toronto Cost: Free For information, please visit: tasteofthedanforth.com Read more at greekcitytimes.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)

Gambling Tourism: Mont Parnes and Hyatt Regency post improved results in H1 2018

The casino sector in Greece continues to struggle, according to first half 2018 results, with both the number of visitors, revenues and profits also down for the sector in general. Aggravating the local gaming industry's woes are accumulated damages from previous years, on top of arrears, such as months of back pay to employees and failure to meet pay tax and social security contributions. Specifically for H1 2018, the number of visitors to the nine casinos in Greece reached 1.333 million, down slightly from 1.364 million in the corresponding period of 2017, a decrease of 2.26 percent. The "total casino drop", the revenue benchmark used in the gaming industry, reached 740.5 million euros, falling from 754.2 million euros during the first half of 2017, a decrease of 1.81 percent. In terms of the "total casino win" figure, the total reached 116.1 million euros, down from 120 million euros in H1 2017 or 3.23 percent. For June 2018, the last month for which numbers are available, the number of people that passed through the nine casinos' doors reached 219,565, down from 211,487 in 2017, a reduction of 3.82 percent. The total casino drop was 120.7 million, down from 122.3 million in June 2017 (-1.31 percent). Conversely, the total casino win total was up in June 2018, rising to19.3 million euros, up from 18.9 million in June last year (1.79 percent). In terms of visitors, Mont Parnes' Regency recorded a marginal rise of 0.16 percent (H1 to H1); Thessaloniki's Hyatt Regency was up by 8.13 percent and Corfu was up by 1.9 percent. At the opposite side of the spectrum, Halkidiki prefecture's Porto Carras casino saw its first-half 2018 figure for visitors decrease by 43.3 percent; 18.29 percent down for the casino in the small resort town of Rio, outside Patras; and 12.21 percent for the troubled and debt-laden casino in the resort city of Loutraki, west of Athens. Only Mont Parnes (on a mountaintop overlooking the greater Athens area) and the Hyatt Regency in Thessaloniki announced improved results in H1 2018 for the total casino drop and total casino win categories. Read more at naftemporiki.gr RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Antoine Taveneaux License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Greek national film office network in public investment program

A plan by Greece to set up a national network of film offices aimed at drawing foreign productions to the country will be paid for the state's public investment program, an announcement said Friday, according to ANA. According to a decision from Alternate Economy Minister Alexis Charitsis, five million euros will be allocated to setting up film offices at regions and municipalities around the country. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: pixabay.com Let's block ads! (Why?)

European Central Bank will revoke waiver for Greek banks

The European Central Bank said on Friday it will restrict Greek banks’ access to its cheapest funding operations from Aug 21, a day after the country's bailout program ends, ANA reports. The ECB will revoke a so-called ‘waiver’ which permitted Greek banks to post junk-rated government bonds as collateral in regular funding operations, in a move that will boost funding costs for Greek lenders. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: DaveOinSF~commonswiki  License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Pythagoreion Theater on Greek island of Samos hosts Young Artists Festival

It is widely said that good musicians perform equally well in the studio, on stage or in the shower. That tends to be true, but it’s also true that some venues (such as the ancient theaters of Epidaurus and the Herod Atticus in Athens) offer so much atmosphere that they help to produce even stronger performances. It’s especially true when it comes to young artists who are just starting out and are easily inspired. The 2,500-year-old Pythagoreion Theater on the island of Samos, where the Samos Young Artists Festival is taking place, is one such venue. Held by the Schwarz Foundation, the festival features accomplished young musicians from all over the world in a promising musical program. “Our goal is to present all kinds of cultivated music. That doesn’t mean that we’ll only be hearing classical works, however. On the contrary, there will be a good dose of contemporary works, as well as a traditional music performance by Savina Yannatou (August 13) in harmony with the island setting,” said the festival’s young artistic director, Alexis Karaiskakis-Nastos. A skilled cellist, he and other Greek musicians have a stronger presence than ever at this year’s event. “From the start we wanted to bring more Greek artists, to show that there are many talented ones here. Aside from the successful Leonidas Kavakos, there are also other equally remarkable albeit less well-known musicians,” Nastos explains. Perhaps the most significant  aspect of the festival is that at a time of global uncertainty, an island like Samos, just 1.2 kilometers from the Turkish mainland, is serving as a bridge for people to come together, cooperate, and shatter discriminatory views. “We have plenty of Turkish guests this year, and, for the first time, a Greek-Turkish artistic partnership, aiming to show how music can be an example of openness and conversation,” Nastos concludes. Concerts take place at the Pythagorion Theater, beginning at 8.30 p.m. each day through August 14. Read more at ekathimerini.com RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons Copyright: Tomisti License: CC-BY-SA  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Higher turnover and passenger numbers for Fraport Greece in H1 2018

Fraport Greece's parent company foresees passenger increases at the 14 regional airports in Greece that the former manages around the east Mediterranean country, with the increased numbers expected in the high single-digit territory. Fraport AG's published results this week for H1 2018 record higher turnover for the entire group by 13 percent, compared with the same period last year, reaching 1.532 billion euros. The report included a special reference to its Greek subsidiary, citing its "substantive contribution" to the group's higher turnover. Fraport Greece's turnover in the first half of 2018 rose to 141.7 million euros, up by 83.5 million euros compared to the same period of 2017. Nevertheless, the figure is incomplete, given that Fraport Greece assumed the management of the 14 airports in April 2017, with the facilities still managed by the Greek state in the first quarter of 2017. Operational  expenditures for Fraport Greece reached 101.1  million euros during H1 2018, while EBITDA stood at 41.3 million euros. On the down side, Fraport Greece still recorded a loss of 20.7 million euros in end results, a development Fraport executives in Germany have predicted in the first years of their subsidiary's operation in the Greek market, due to the concession payment and major overhauls at all 14 of the airports. Read more at naftemporiki.gr RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)

Pebble mosaic dating to 4th century BC discovered in Greek city of Arta

A pebble mosaic in a bathhouse dated to the 4th century BC was unearthed during an excavation at the Small Theater of Ancient Amvrakia conducted recently by the Ephorate of Antiquities in Arta, ANA reports. The round mosaic consists of small white, off-white and dark river pebbles showing scenes related to water. Besides a border decoration setting it off from other spaces, it features cupids playing with animals, swans, fish, water fowl and an octopus. The pebble mosaic is earlier than the theater, and is related to a similar mosaic found in the '70s, partly covered by the eastern part of the theater and later removed to the Archaeological Museum of Arta. Photo Source: Ephorate of Antiquities in Arta In a press statement, the Arta ephorate said the dating was based on architectural evidence and on comparisons with pebble mosaics found at the Ancient Corinth baths, dated to the mid-4th century. The supervision of the excavations is carried out by archaeologist Nektarios-Petros Gioutsos and three conservators have already taken measures to preserve and stabilize the new find. Arta, in western Greece, has been inhabited continuously from antiquity to the present, and the layered remains of older settlements are still visible in various parts of the present city. The Small Theater is situated in the center of the modern city. The excavation is funded by the EU's NSRF funding plan for 2014-2020. Arta in Antiquity Arta (Greek: Άρτα) is a city in northwestern Greece, capital of the regional unit of Arta, which is part of Epirus region. The city was known in ancient times as Ambracia (Ancient Greek: Ἀμβρακία). Arta is known for the medieval bridge over the Arachthos River. It is also known for its ancient sites from the era of Pyrrhus of Epirus and its well-preserved 13th-century castle. Arta's Byzantine history is reflected in its many Byzantine churches; perhaps the best known is the Panagia Paregoretissa (Mother of God the Consoling), built about 1290 by Despot Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas.  The first settlement in the area of the modern city dates to the 9th century B.C. Ambracia was founded as a Corinthian colony in the 7th century B.C. In 294 BC, after forty-three years of semi-autonomy under Macedonian suzerainty, Ambracia was given to Pyrrhus, king of the Molossians and of Epirus, who made it his capital, using Ambracia as a base to attack the Romans. Pyrrhus managed to achieve great but costly victories against the Romans, hence the phrase "Pyrrhic victory" which refers in particular to an exchange at the Battle of Asculum. Nevertheless, Pyrrhus found the time and means to adorn his capital with a palace, temples and theatres. In 146 BC, Ambracia became part of the Roman Republic. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations , Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)