Author Archives: Santorini Hotels

US News & World Report: Athens among 20 best honeymoon destinations for 2020

The Greek capital of Athens is among the 20 best honeymoon destinations for 2020, according to U.S. News recently released its 2020 Best Honeymoon Destinations Rankings. Two Greek islands are also among the top-20 wedding tourism destinations in the world for 2020. The iconic Greek island of Santorini ranked 8th while Corfu island ranked 20th. Santorini also ranked ninth-best among seaside destinations for wedding tourism in the world, while Corfu was elected as the cheapest such destination for 2020. Among the most economical destinations for wedding trips in the world, Crete ranked 9th and Athens ranked 11th. Among Best European wedding destinations for 2020, Santorini ranked 4th, Corfu ranked 9th, Crete 11th and Mykonos 13th. This year, the U.S. News & World Report decided to break down their rankings into six different categories based on user votes, expert opinions, privacy and location reputation, and couple-friendly activities. More than 700 destinations were evaluated. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: pixabay.com Let's block ads! (Why?)

Mystery woman’s bones unearthed at “eternal male monastery” of Mount Athos in Greece

A group of scientists announced on Sunday in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki that they had discovered bones “most certainly” belonging to a woman who was buried centuries ago at the cemetery of Pantokratoros Monastery on Mount Athos. The Greek “Holy Mountain” with its nearly 1,800-year continuous Christian presence is home to twenty monasteries where only men are allowed to visit. The bones were unearthed during restoration work being done on the floor of the chapel of St. Athanasios of Athonitis, where all burial ceremonies of laymen connected with the monastery have taken place. Restorer Phedon Hatziantoniou, who headed the team of experts, speculated that the bones might possibly belong to a woman called Stasha, the wife of a 16th-century landlord called Barboul or Barbouli who lived at the monastery with his sons. The remains have been sent to highly specialized laboratories in Athens for further examination. “As far as I know this is the first case that bones belonging to a woman have been discovered on Mt. Athos,” Hatziantoniou noted  in an interview with Greek daily newspaper To Ethnos. “It is well known that in the past when there were invasions or revolutions, the monks opened their border and their monasteries to protect the local population,” he pointed out. The scientists have also found fragments of bones belonging to men in their research. They say that these were probably workers and support staff since monks have their own ossuary inside the monastery’s main building. Reports of sightings of women on Mt. Athos have been quite rare during the centuries. However, a grainy, black and white photograph of a woman which was published in a Greek newspaper in 1903 still remains a mystery, with some monks claiming that they believe the unknown female on the left was the Virgin Mary herself. The stooping figure also closely resembles a black-robed Orthodox nun. The women’s ban on Mount Athos has been violated only twelve times (officially at least) since the year 382. The following are the incidents in which this is known to have happened. – In 382 by the Plakentia, the daughter of Emperor Theodosius I.– In 1081 and 1108 by shepherd families (numbering more than 300).– In 1345 by the Eleni, the wife of Serbian Emperor Stefan Dusan.– In 1404 by the wife of Ioannis Palaiologos.– In 1854 by a group of young girls who sought protection after the Halkidiki uprising.– In 1905 by the young Russian princess Tatiana Nikita.– In 1929 by Aliki Diplarakou, the Greek “Miss Europe” — dressed as a man– In 1931 by French journalist Maryse Choisy, who disguised herself as a sailor and wrote about her experience in a book entitled “One Month With Men.”– In 1948 by a group of women from the Democratic Army of Greece who broke the guard and entered as they were being chased by the Greek Army during the Civil War.– In 1953 by American teacher Cora Miller.– In 1971 by French philologist Jacqueline Michele and Italians Luisa Barbarito and Maria Pastterla. Greek reporter Malvina Karali was the most recent woman to break the ban and enter onto the territory of Mount Athos, when, as she claims, she entered the sanctuary dressed as a man in the 1990s. Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Gabriel  Let's block ads! (Why?)

Eurobarometer poll: Greeks remain focused on economic recovery

While climate change was listed as the key priority for European lawmakers by most citizens in the bloc in the autumn edition of the Eurobarometer survey published on Tuesday, 46 percent of Greeks coming out of the 10-year recession want to see measures for combatting youth unemployment and 32 percent see the environment as the top issue, ekathimerini.com reports. Combatting social exclusion and poverty was the second-highest priority in Greece (with 38 percent against a European average of 31 percent), followed by creating the conditions for growth and investments (27 percent against 18 percent), indicating that Greeks are seeking measures focused on the country’s economic recovery. Migration is also significant to Greeks, with 24 percent of respondents putting safeguarding the EU’s external borders as the fifth most important issue that needs to be addressed by European Parliament, just below investing in high-quality education (25 percent). Asked what values ought to be among the EU Parliament’s priorities, 61 percent of Greeks and 48 percent of Europeans put safeguarding human rights at the top of the list, even though solidarity among EU member states came second in Greece with 58 percent, against fourth place in Europe with 33 percent. Freedom of speech is also considered dear by 41 percent of Greeks and 38 percent of Europeans, with gender equality coming in at the same level in Europe, though significantly lower in Greece, where just 20 percent saw it as a matter of priority. On environmental issues specifically, the verdict was unanimous: 59 percent of Greeks and 52 percent of Europeans said it must be given priority over other areas such as pollution of the air, sea and waterways. For the full report, click here. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Andrikkos Let's block ads! (Why?)

First meeting of National Research, Tech and Innovation Council in Greece

Innovation is for the first time accorded an equal role in the Secretariat for Research and Technology, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said on Tuesday at the first session of the National Council on Research, Technology, and Innovation, according to ANA. "This is precisely an example of the government's will to link research with innovation and this, in turn, with the economy," he said, noting that this was the reason why the specific secretariat was transferred to the development ministry. The PM noted that the Greek researchers' union will for the first time participate in the Council's meetings, while the new body will be responsible for encouraging public sector organizations to incorporate research results and innovative products generated by the General Secretariat for Research and Technology in their operations. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Wikimedia_Foundation_Servers_8055 Let's block ads! (Why?)

Greek engineers assist Albania to inspect quake-damaged buildings

AP reports from Tirana that Albania’s prime minister on Monday hailed the work of Israeli engineers who have come to the country to help in the aftermath of a devastating earthquake that destroyed thousands of buildings. The Israelis are among scores of foreign engineers and experts who have come or will be headed to the country to assist determine whether buildings left standing can still be inhabited or to help construct buildings to replace those that were destroyed. On Sunday, Rama was in Istanbul to meet with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Turkish and Arab businessmen to solicit help. Turkish engineers are already in Albania to prepare for the construction of 500 homes. Other countries sending engineers include Greece, Italy, the United States, France, Bulgaria, and Romania. The 6.4-magnitude earthquake on November 26 killed 51 people and injured more than 3,000 others. More than 11,000 buildings were damaged and an estimated 13,000 people made homeless. Many have found shelter in hotels, public buildings, tents, with relatives or in neighboring Kosovo. The government said Monday that out of roughly 6,000 buildings checked with scores of structural engineers, some 2,450 could not be used for living or working and 460 had to be demolished. Forty-three buildings already have been demolished. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Marmelad Let's block ads! (Why?)

Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens honors American sculptor Lynda Benglis

The Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens celebrates the work of American pioneer sculptor Lynda Benglis in an exhibition titled “In the Realm of the Senses“ which runs through March 15, 2020, according to int.ert.gr. Since the 1960s Lynda Benglis has received widespread critical acclaim for her impressive ideas projected into three dimensions. Her sculptures are simultaneously playful and visceral, organic and abstract. Benglis began her career on the cusp of Post-Minimalism, pushing the traditions of painting and sculpture into new territory. Her art encompasses diverse materials: from beeswax, latex and polyurethane foam to later innovative work with plaster, gold, vaporized metals, glass, ceramics and paper. Throughout, Benglis has maintained a fascination with process. Flowing forms, sensual surfaces, vivid hues and erotic elements pervade her abstract yet provocative treatment of the body and nature. It is the artist’s first solo museum show in a country that has played a major role in her life and vision: Greece. Spanning half a century from 1969 onwards, the select survey of thirty-six sculptures will display a wide spectrum of Benglis’s materials, imagery and ideas. Describing the artist’s first wax reliefs as early as 1968, the New York gallerist and critic Klaus Kertess said that “skin, pull, sensuousness” ranked among her primary concerns. Such intense corporeal sensations extend to the present – as Benglis’s sculptures constantly shift between fixity and movement, nature and flesh, with both grace and provocative boldness. Among the media the artist uses are: wax, bronze, aluminum, marble, latex, ceramics and glass, while the themes include “fallen paintings” (the iconic Baby Contraband), “knots”, “lagniappes”, “torsos”, “pleats” and “fountains”. Visual conversations arise between textures (liquid to waxy and metallic), colours (San Marcos’s monochrome bronzy sheen versus the multi-hued papers made over wire) and orientation (horizontal flow opposing the totemic vertical beeswax pieces). The guest curator is the distinguished writer, critic and art historian, Dr. David Anfam. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Tilemahos Efthimiadis Let's block ads! (Why?)

Finance Minister at NY Capital Link forum: Greek economy returning to normalcy

The dynamic restart of the Greek economy was the principal focus of Greek Finance Minister Christos Staikouras's address to American investors at Capital Link's 21st Annual Invest in Greece Forum in New York City on Monday, ANA reports. He included, among others, the following: closing fiscal gaps; achieving fiscal targets; reducing property tax; abolishing the remaining capital controls; overturning ineffective labor market laws; promoting a systematic solution to NPLs in banks; restarting major infrastructural works and privatizations; paying off the most expensive part of the IMF loan; passing a law to improve the investment climate; regulating the e-games market, and passing a comprehensive taxation reform that will accelerate economic development.  RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Let's block ads! (Why?)

New project will form first ever archive of Greek-American music (video)

The new “Greek Music in America Archives Project,” funded by the National Endowment for the Arts in 2019-2020, will be the first-ever comprehensive and publicly-accessible collection of Greek music recorded in America or recorded in Greece by American companies, from 1896 to 1985, according to greekreporter.com. Comprised of analog discs, audiotapes, piano rolls, cylinders, and associated ephemera such as record catalogs, sheet music, images, and other media, this would be the first such time such a resource has ever been compiled. The endeavor is a cooperation between Florida Cultural Resources, Inc. and the Archives of Traditional Music (ATM) and Indiana University. The director of the ambitious project is Tina Bucuvalas, who organized it in consultation with archivists and music specialists. The millions of members of the Greek diaspora naturally brought the music of their homeland with them to their new nations. Music was a big part of most social occasions, bringing people together in song and dance. It was such a priceless component of Greek communities that it formed a kind of cultural glue. Greek music record production became a natural outgrowth of this need for Greek-Americans to keep the memories of their homeland alive. Along with its preservation through live performance and record production, there continued to be permutations of Greek music, as the new land offered new and diverse influences to it. Even though nostalgia for the homeland was predominant – and therefore most music recorded in America was traditional – sometimes new styles also came into the mix. From 1896 to 1942, more than 1,000 records featuring Greek music came onto the market in the U.S. and thousands more have been released since that time, as new recording techniques made it possible to record sound with greater acoustic fidelity. The new project is comprised of three parts: 1) surveying current holdings in the Archives of Traditional Music or materials relevant to the GMAAP; (2) acquiring about 1000 recordings not already in the ATM; 3) cataloging newly acquired materials using the Folklore Collections Database of the National Folklore Archives Initiative.  Along with Bucuvalas, the team is made up of archivist/folklorist Andy Kolovos, who has expertise in archiving folklife and audio materials, as well as knowledge of collections nationwide and recorded Greek music connoisseurs Meletios Pouliopoulos and Steve Frangos, who will acquire the collection. Consultants and advisors for the project will include Dick Spottswood, an expert in ethnic music recordings; ethnomusicologist Michael G. Kaloyanides, knowledgeable in Greek urban and rural genres; as well as ethnomusicologist Panayotis League, who is an expert in traditional Greek island music.  RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Rennett Stowe  Source: Florida Division of Cultural Resources Let's block ads! (Why?)

TrainOSE adds two trains to the Athens-Thessaloniki routes during Christmas

TrainOSE, Greece's passenger and freight trains operator, on Monday announced an additional schedule to and from Athens and Thessaloniki, in view of heightened demand over the Christmas festive season, ANA reports. As of December 15, every Friday, Sunday and Monday, train service 3500 will leave Athens at 1:26 pm, make a stop at Larissa at 4:14 pm and arrive at Thessaloniki at 5:35 pm. On the same days, train service 3501 will depart Thessaloniki at 4:00 pm, stop at Larissa at 5:19 pm and will arrive in Athens at 8:01 pm. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: Tobias b köhler Let's block ads! (Why?)

Four Greek scientists participate in NASA’s ”Touch the Sun” mission

NASA‘s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which was launched in August of 2018 in a bid to study the sun more closely than ever before, recently began sending its first data back to Earth, offering valuable information to mankind about our solar system’s only star,  according to greekreporter.com. There are four Greek scientists on the teams that are responsible for executing this important scientific quest, and their contributions are extremely valuable to this latest NASA project. The ”Touch the Sun” mission’s studies will help scientists to better predict space “weather” as well as to understand the behavior of other stars in the universe, apart from our sun. The Greek scientists who have been elected to take part in the mission are in two of the four study groups which are part of this NASA project. Academic-space scientist Stamatis Krimizis, and researcher Olga Malandraki of the Institute of Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications & Remote Astronomy of the National Observatory of Athens are two of the Greek citizens responsible for the Parker Solar Probe mission. The others are Astrophysicist Angelos Vourlidas from Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory and Athanasios Couloumbakos, from the Institute of Research, Astrophysics and Planetology in Toulouse, France. Their work in NASA’s multinational teams will enhance our broader understanding of a series of various aspects of the sun’s functionalities and their importance to human life on Earth. RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, Greek islands, Hotels in Greece, Travel to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: NASA Let's block ads! (Why?)